"I was in another ladies

Lizzie Dripping dance repertoire

Bole Hill (Tune: Pepper in the Brandy)
Choreographed by the team and named after a beauty spot in Sheffield, this hard-shoe dance is based on traditional folk dance movements and is danced to a well-known John Kirkpatrick tune.

Deva (Tune: Happy Hours)
A lively‘Fluffy Morris’ style dance, using red pom-poms and based on the North West tradition. Choreographed by team members it is named after the Latin name for Chester, the home town of the team member who created the dance.

French Canadian steps - set 1 (Tune: Jock Wilson of Fenton)
We learned this set of steps from members of Sheffield Celebrated Clog and choreographed them into our own routine, using a Northumbrian tune.

French Canadian steps - set 2 (Tune: Polka Chinoise)
This great set of fast French Canadian steps were learned from members of Carlisle Sword & Clog team at a Whitby Folk Festival workshop.

First of August (Tune: The White Cockade)
A dance from the Hebrides choreographed by the team using a selection of the original steps.

Greenham (Tune: Long Odds)
Choreographed by the team and originally dedicated to the women of the Greenham Common peace camp, this dance represents the coming together of women in the name of peace. Now dedicated to women all over the world. We often finish our performance spots with this dance and encourage the audience to join in.

Hebridean Weaving Dance (Tunes: The Orange and The Blue; Kafoozalum)
This is a traditional dance which uses the movement of the weaving loom: the shuttle moving back and forth and the bobbin winding and unwinding. At the end of the dance the pace changes as the women finish work and can begin to enjoy themselves.

Hexham Flag Dance (Tune: Oswestry Wake)
One of our more recent dances, learned from the Hexhamshire Lasses at a workshop at Whitby Folk Festival. A lively dance, very fast and lots of fun.

Jet Set Drift (Tune: William Clarke's Speed the Plough).
Our newest dance, developed and choreographed by team member Linda Poore, originally learned from Whitby-based Jet Set Border Morris. A delightfully tight, angular dance; the music an unusual and interesting 19th C. variant of a well known tune.

Mona’s Delight (Tune: Eunsach Vona - Mona's Delight)
A social dance from the Isle of Man, re-choreographed for display purposes.

Prime Minister’s Breakdown (Tune: Jockey to the Fair)
Based on an Australian social dance called Constitution Reel, this lively dance represents the delicate balance of power and shows how easy it is to topple a megalomaniac politician!

Primrose (Tune: Primrose Polka)
Choreographed in 1982, this was one of the first dances Lizzie Dripping ever performed. It is a light and graceful dance, based around flower patterns.

Rose of Rochester (Tune: Road to Lisdoonvarna)
A social dance for 8 dancers, which we sometimes also dance as a set of 6. Taught to us by a former member, Jess Arrowsmith, who now dances with Pecsaetan Morris and performs with Hekety and Crucible.

Shetland Reel (Tune: Willafjord)
A compact traditional dance, originally danced in the kitchen. We learned a version of this from the Newcastle Cloggies but have included some of our own steps.

Spooners (Tunes: La Schottische; Evesham Stick Dance)
Choreographed by the team, this is a dance for 6 or 12 dancers. The dance incorporates traditional steps and reel-based movements. The sweeping movement with the red pom-poms represents the stirring of spoons.

Trumpet Hornpipe (Tune: Stony Steps)
A choreographed set of steps for two dancers, learned from Liz Lawson and Sheila Kennedy (formerly of Carlisle Morris & Clog, now members of Rivington Morris and Silkstone Greens)

Twiglets (Tune: Theme Vannetaise)
A Border style dance, taught to us by members of Boggarts Breakfast, this was originally danced with sticks but we have now re-choreographed it using scarves.

Tŷ Coch Caerdydd (Tune: Tŷ Coch Caerdydd)
This dance was learned by one of our members when she lived in Wales. It was choreographed in 1966 for the National Eisteddfod, where it won a prize. The traditional Welsh tune 'Tŷ Coch Caerdydd' literally translates as ‘The Red house of Cardiff’,

Westmorland (Tune: Sandy River Belle)
Several members of the team learned these steps many years ago from Jane and Lindsey Flett, and choreographed them for the team.

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